Cultural heritage sites
San Diego Cultural Heritage Alliance

HISTORIC SITES

HISTORIC BRIDGES

While San Diego is more famous for its beaches than its bridges, the region has many historical and often walkable spans with one-of-a-kind architectural features from the striking Cabrillo Bridge, which creates a grand entry to Balboa Park from Laurel Street, to the Spruce Street Pedestrian Bridge, a suspension bridge spanning Kate Sessions Canyon for more than a century. Here is a sample of some of San Diego's historic bridges.

Cabrillo Bridge
Built in 1915
Designed by San Francisco architect Thomas B. Hunter for the 1915 Panama-California Exposition, it was the first multiple arched cantilevered bridge in California. Dedicated by Franklin Roosevelt on April 12, 1914, it spanned a small lake for the exposition. The concrete forms were originally framed in wood. After several fires over the years in the pillars, a major renovation removed the wood. Directions

First Avenue Bridge
Built in 1931
The only steel-arch bridge in San Diego, it was built in 1931 in a Midwestern factory. There it was assembled and then dismantled and shipped to San Diego and reassembled to span Maple Canyon. Originally called the People's Bridge because it was erected at the request of the local homeowners. The bridge has been fully retrofitted to California earthquake standards. Directions

Georgia Street Bridge
Built in 1914
Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, this bridge, which gracefully arches over University Avenue, was erected in 1914. It replaced a redwood truss bridge that previously linked the two sides of Georgia Street. The ridge was cut to allow for a streetcar system to connect North Park with the rest of the city. Directions

Goat Canyon Trestle
Built in 1919
Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, this bridge, which gracefully arches over University Avenue, was erected in 1914. It replaced a redwood truss bridge that previously linked the two sides of Georgia Street. The ridge was cut to allow for a streetcar system to connect North Park with the rest of the city. More information

Quince Street Footbridge
Built in 1905
This wooden trestle bridge, built in 1905 for less than $1,000, is a pedestrian bridge over Maple Canyon. It faced demolition in the 1980s but has since been repaired and reopened. Directions

San Diego-Coronado Bridge
Built in 1969
The 2.12-mile span gracefully curving over San Diego Bay is the city's most prominent bridge. Opened on Aug. 3, 1969, the bridge was designed by Robert Mosher and has the world's longest continuous box girder, concealing braces, joints and stiffeners, which are usually visible on bridges. The design uses orthotropic construction that was first used in Germany during World War II on battleships. Directions

Spruce Street Suspension Bridge
Built in 1912
This bridge dating to 1912 was designed by Edwin M. Capps, an engineer who was also a major of San Diego. The walkway is suspended by steel cables 70 feet over Kate Sessions Canyon and will sway in response to the wind and pedestrians. Directions

Share

2476 San Diego Avenue · San Diego CA 92110 · Phone (619) 297-9327
Home | Contact